Asthma steroid inhaler brown

Q. Do I need to go through all the patient records on the PMR system for the last 6 months and identify any patients who have been prescribed more than 6 short acting bronchodilator inhalers without a corticosteroid inhaler within a 6-month period to meet this criterion?
No. Contractors do not need to have reviewed 6 months of patient records to meet this criterion. On the day of the review the pharmacy must be able to show evidence of the asthma patients, for whom more than 6 short acting bronchodilator inhalers were dispensed without any corticosteroid inhaler within a 6-month period, that have been referred to an appropriate health care professional for an asthma review. There must, therefore, be a process in place, to identify these asthma patients. This process can be incorporated into daily practice (PSNC has suggested a process for referring patients for an asthma review).

Nebulisers are machines that turn the liquid form of your short-acting bronchodilator medicines into a fine mist, like an aerosol. You breathe this in with a face mask or a mouthpiece. Nebulisers are no more effective than normal inhalers. However, they are extremely useful in people who are very tired (fatigued) with their breathing, or in people who are very breathless. Nebulisers are used mainly in hospital for severe attacks of asthma when large doses of inhaled medicines are needed. They are used less commonly than in the past, as modern spacer devices are usually just as good as nebulisers for giving large doses of inhaled medicines. You do not need any co-ordination to use a nebuliser - you just breathe in and out, and you will breathe in the medicine.

For children who are not able to use a mouthpiece (under age 4 – depends on child), a facemask can be used with the MDI.

  • Shake the inhaler and prime it (if needed), then insert into the back of the chamber. Have the child sit on an adult's lap, make sure there are no small objects inside the chamber , and gently place the mask over the child’s mouth and nose (the child will be able to breath normally).
  • Pump the inhaler once and hold the mask in place as the child breaths in 6 times.
  • If more puffs of medicine have been prescribed, repeat these steps.
  • The child has gotten the medicine if his/her chest moved in and out for 6 breaths or a hand, placed the child's belly, moved up and down 6 times.
Hand wash the chamber with face mask once a week with warm water and dishwashing soap. Rinse gently with warm water and let air dry (do not use a towel). Replace if chamber gets cracked or broken.

Along with allergic asthma, eczema and hay fever are known as 'atopic conditions'. If you're atopic, it means your body produces a certain type of antibody, called immunoglobulin E (IgE), in response to harmless allergens, such as pollen, moulds and dust mites. If you're atopic, you could have one, two or all three of the conditions. For example, 80 per cent of people with asthma also have hay fever. Plus if you have family members who are atopic, you're more likely to develop asthma. Speak to your GP or asthma nurse if you have any questions about any of these conditions.

Family history is a risk factor for asthma, with many different genes being implicated. [67] If one identical twin is affected, the probability of the other having the disease is approximately 25%. [67] By the end of 2005, 25 genes had been associated with asthma in six or more separate populations, including GSTM1 , IL10 , CTLA-4 , SPINK5 , LTC4S , IL4R and ADAM33 , among others. [68] Many of these genes are related to the immune system or modulating inflammation. Even among this list of genes supported by highly replicated studies, results have not been consistent among all populations tested. [68] In 2006 over 100 genes were associated with asthma in one genetic association study alone; [68] more continue to be found. [69]

Asthma steroid inhaler brown

asthma steroid inhaler brown

Along with allergic asthma, eczema and hay fever are known as 'atopic conditions'. If you're atopic, it means your body produces a certain type of antibody, called immunoglobulin E (IgE), in response to harmless allergens, such as pollen, moulds and dust mites. If you're atopic, you could have one, two or all three of the conditions. For example, 80 per cent of people with asthma also have hay fever. Plus if you have family members who are atopic, you're more likely to develop asthma. Speak to your GP or asthma nurse if you have any questions about any of these conditions.

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