Ketosteroids side effects

Q. Had FMS for almost twenty years now, tried almost everything. Is Lyrica in the "steroid" family? Any one in this community could help me? I have given my few questions to find out an answer. I Had FMS for almost twenty years now, tried almost everything. I'm considering Lyrica but I'd like more info. Is Lyrica in the "steroid" family? If you go on Lyrica for a while & see no improvement with pain, is going off of it a big deal like with other med's, or can you simply just stop taking it? I take Ambien, will that have any interactions? I'm seeing my Doc about this at the end of the month, but I was hoping to get some personal experiences about it. Thanks for any thoughts! Thanks for your answers, keep them coming! A. according to this-
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there is a moderate interaction. that means you can take them both but be checked regularly for depression of breath.

The TSH receptor is formed as one polypeptide chain and inserted into the thyroid cell plasma membrane. It undergoes a processing that is reminiscent of that occurring with insulin. A segment of 30 or more amino acids is cut out of the receptor at approximately residue 320, forming a two peptide structure with the chains held together by disulfide bonds. It is thought that both the intact and the processed receptor are functional. The processing of the receptor is thought to involve a matrix metalloprotease-like enzyme cleaving the 120 kDa precursor to form the heterodimeric receptor. Subsequently, reduction of the disulfide bonds by a protein disulfide isomerase may separate the two molecules and lead to shedding of the “alpha” subunit. It is an interesting concept that shedding of the alpha subunit might be intimately related to onset of autoimmunity against the TSH receptor. Shedding of the receptor is augmented by TSH stimulation of thyroid cells (58). The amino-terminal ectodomain of the human TSH receptor has been expressed on the surface of CHO cells as a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored molecule. This material can be released from the cells and is biologically active in that it binds immunoglobulins from serum of patients with Graves’ disease, and displays saturable binding of TSH (46), indicating that all of the “immunologic information” related to production of antibodies resides in the extracellular portion of TSH-R.

Standardized rhodiola supplements have also been put to the test in physicians during two-week stretches on night duty and in students during final exams. These trials have confirmed the herb’s general anti-fatigue effect, showing that it improves tests of physical fitness, mental fatigue and neuromotor function under stress.
Many people who have tried rhodiolareport that they feel better while taking it. The experience is described in terms of a continuous sensation of physical and mental relief from stress, and anecdotally the effect appears to be most pronounced in people who typically respond to stress with anger or feelings of helplessness. Animal studies on rhodiola have given us some clues as to the neurochemical basis of these effects, such as its effects on the metabolism of the serotoninergic system, boosting brain levels of dopamine, acetylcholine, and norepinephrine. The evidence also seems to suggest that rhodiola  influences the synthesis, levels, and/or activity of endorphins and enkephalins, since blocking the receptors for some of these “feel-good” peptides negates some of  its effects.

Probenecid
Central Nervous System: headache, dizziness.
Metabolic: precipitation of acute gouty arthritis.
Gastrointestinal : hepatic necrosis, vomiting, nausea, anorexia, sore gums.
Genitourinary: nephritic syndrome, uric acid stones with or without hematuria, renal colic, costovertebral pain, urinary frequency.
Hypersensitivity: anaphylaxis, fever, urticaria, pruritus.
Hematologic: aplastic anemia, leukopenia, hemolytic anemia which in some patients could be related to genetic deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in red blood cells, anemia.
Integumentary: dermatitis, alopecia, flushing.

CORTROSYN™ (cosyntropin) for Injection exhibits slight immunologic activity, does not contain animal protein and is therefore less risky to use than natural ACTH. Patients known to be sensitized to natural ACTH with markedly positive skin tests will, with few exceptions, react negatively when tested intradermally with CORTROSYN™. Most patients with a history of a previous hypersensitivity reaction to natural ACTH or a pre-existing allergic disease will tolerate CORTROSYN™. Despite this however, CORTROSYN™ is not completely devoid of immunologic activity and hypersensitivity reactions including rare anaphylaxis are possible. Therefore, the physician should be prepared, prior to injection, to treat any possible acute hypersensitivity reaction.

Ketosteroids side effects

ketosteroids side effects

Probenecid
Central Nervous System: headache, dizziness.
Metabolic: precipitation of acute gouty arthritis.
Gastrointestinal : hepatic necrosis, vomiting, nausea, anorexia, sore gums.
Genitourinary: nephritic syndrome, uric acid stones with or without hematuria, renal colic, costovertebral pain, urinary frequency.
Hypersensitivity: anaphylaxis, fever, urticaria, pruritus.
Hematologic: aplastic anemia, leukopenia, hemolytic anemia which in some patients could be related to genetic deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in red blood cells, anemia.
Integumentary: dermatitis, alopecia, flushing.

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